Sunday, July 31, 2011



Summer Sunday Low Mass

7th Sunday after Pentecost:
Deus, cujus providentia in sui dispositione non fallitur, te supplices exoramus,
ut noxia cuncta submoveas, et omnia nobis profutura concedas. Per Jesum Christum, Filium tuum, Dominum nostrum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti, Deus, per omnia sæcula sæculorum. Amen.
Translation.

Used for the 8th Sunday after Trinity, two weeks from now, in the old Book of Common Prayer and American Missal (what I hope will be the American ordinariate’s missal as it is, besides the translated Tridentine, for Antiochian Western Rite Orthodox; same gospel as today too):
O God, whose never-failing providence ordereth all things both in heaven and earth; we humbly beseech thee to put away from us all hurtful things, and to give us those things which be profitable for us; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
Nice embellishment to the Latin text: it’s orthodox.

Like the parts of a High Mass in the scene in the opening credits of True Confessions, here are highlights to show you the look and sound of a traditional Low Mass. I didn’t upload the whole thing, only about 40 minutes including a fine sermon, because YouTube limits me to 2GB. The earliest Sunday Mass at Our Lady of Lourdes, Overbrook, run by the Mercedarian friars and the showplace of Pope Benedict’s renewal to West Philly and the Main Line. (The Sung Mass is eastward Novus Ordo partly in Latin.) For those who don’t know, the priest reads the epistle and gospel at the altar then, as shown here, repeats them in the vernacular. The prayers at the foot of the altar, or prep office as I call it, are done. In my opinion Mass begins when the priest opens the book and reads the introit and ends with the last blessing but of course I like the parts added on. You hear a few et cum spiritu tuos from the congregation but I don’t think it’s really a dialogue Mass.


By the way the hand missal I’m holding is a sturdy liturgical-movement treasure, the Maryknoll one (this one from 1957). No thous and thees but that’s OK. (I can have that during the week from Winfred Douglas’ diurnal.) Lots of Latin, sound theology and artwork from Beuron Abbey in Germany (the good kind of modern as NLM might say).

St Ignatius Loyola drops out of today’s observance, outranked by Sunday, at least in the ’62 missal? Giving and not counting the cost, he understands.

A nice thing about first thing Sunday is even in the dog days of summer it’s cool enough to wear a suit and, to and from church, a felt hat.

P.S. Gotta love Fr Z’s lame-duck ICEL countdown for the Novus Ordo: we NEVER have to HEAR IT AGAIN.
Te Deum laudamus; te Dominum confitemur...

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