Saturday, June 29, 2013

Our culture war: Tutsis vs. Hutus

  • Two big groups of white people who can’t stand the sight of each other. Derb gets it. Paula Deen, George Zimmerman, and more. The Anti-Gnostic: I don't think there is any other population group that hate their underclass kin more than Anglo-American elites. It also goes back to settlement from Britain: the southern English elite North (New England) vs. the Scotch-Irish South.
  • WND: Mock marriage and the death of freedom.
  • 25th anniversary of SSPX bishops. We have our Mass in the official church because the saintly Archbishop Lefebvre sacrificed himself. The Novus Ordo neocons have been slandering the SSPX for decades as having left the church or being the same as the Nuns on the Bus (who are heretics). I don't have to go as far as the SSPX has, where I am, and I agree with the council on religious liberty and ecumenism, but they are not and never were schismatic in principle and I understand their suspicion of mainstream churchmen, who have done a lot of harm to the traditional faith. Happy feast of SS. Peter and Paul. P.S. It’s Not About Latin™ (but I happen to worship in Latin while being tame devotionally: Mass-and-office, pre-conciliar’s version of high-and-dry churchmanship).
  • Anniversary this past week of Archduke Franz Ferdinand’s assassination. The evil and folly of World War I. The world would have been better if the Central Powers had won.
  • WSJ: In search of Grandfather’s style. I’m accidentally part of a trend.

10 comments:

  1. Interesting WSJ article. This may seem unrelated, but I think it's actually quite similar: During the '90s, there was sort of a Jane Austen renaissance, sparked by the wonderful A&E Pride and Prejudice dramatization. Young women went gaga for long empire-waist dresses. (In fact, they've recently made a comeback in the form of maxi dresses.)

    At the time, my hubby commented, "It's as if people are looking to Jane Austen for some standard of gentility and stability that's missing from modern life." I think he nailed it. How else to explain young hedonists' fascination with a socially circumscribed culture with elaborate rules of morality and etiquette? It's almost as if the '90s Wild Children were hankering for Austen's world as a haven from modern chaos and craziness.

    Maybe these guys are hankering for grandfather's world for much the same reason.

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  2. Re: In search of grandfather's style

    My maternal grandfather (born 1890) wore three piece suits and smoked Cuban cigars. Heavenly aroma! When casual at our home (when visiting us), he took off the coat and vest and donned a buttoned, v-neck style light sweater. Still wore his dress shirt with tie (sometimes a bow tie--the tied variety, not clip-on). Immaculately shined leather dress shoes at all times (no loafers). Oh, and a fedora when outside. Definitely in the fogey class!

    I never knew my paternal grandfather. He died 20 years before I was born. R.I.P.

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  3. I just don't know what to think of the SSPX, pro and con. The formal, never-having-changed theology of the modern RCC notwithstanding, the religion of the SSPX is the religion in which I grew up. With all due respect to JP-II, Benedetto XVI, and Papa Francesco, the RCC religion in which I find myself today is different from the religion of my youth. And I never voluntarily changed my religion!

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  4. Oddly, in America, I feel much more at home in New England than the South; yet in the UK I feel much more at home in the North of England and Scotland than I do in the Home Counties.

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  5. About Derb, I find his laments about the decline of traditional American culture difficult to take seriously given his efforts to undermine the basis of that culture. Derb for all of his wit and probing articles, is hard-core materialist with is often hostile to religion. He is pro-abortion, pro-euthansia, etc. In other words, he is a cultural leftist. For personal reasons, he finds liberalism in its modern form unpleasant, but on the fundamental points, he is on the same side as the folks who have driven our civilization into the ditch.

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    1. Thanks for the 411. So he's no paleo. You don't have to agree 100% with people you learn from and like. Those issues probably partly explain why, besides his being English, he was and maybe still is an Episcopalian (like Karl Rove). He was/is high-church: credally orthodox and, unlike Catholic liberals, they love our stuff, but they're socially liberal. I can't imagine him putting up with the denomination's hardline political correctness every Sunday. But they're semi-congregational. Maybe he found a parish that's liturgically conservative and keeps quiet about politics and social issues.

      For personal reasons, he finds liberalism in its modern form unpleasant, but on the fundamental points, he is on the same side as the folks who have driven our civilization into the ditch.

      Paleos and the SSPX would say the same about me for believing in the old American republic, the free market, and religious liberty. Other than the basics of the faith and the old Mass, the SSPX and I have little in common. A reason I can live in the official church as reformed by Pope Benedict. But I acknowledge the good that the SSPX does.

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  6. Yow, I need to work on cleaning up my comments re: typos and clarity! Sorry about that!

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  7. "I don't think there is any other population group that hate their underclass kin more than Anglo-American elites."

    I saw this this past weekend in Asheville, North Carolina. I was in town for the Shindig on the Green, a local affair of bluegrass and clogging. The "respectable" people in the shops and visitor centers, transplants most likely, heard my Yankee accent and tried to steer me towards the Biltmore Estate and wine-tasting, both of which I wanted none of, saying the Shindig was "dirty."

    I ended up having a great time at the Shindig, with the Scotch-Irish folk who've kept their traditions alive. I see them, not the Left, as the true resistance.

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    1. Iosue, do you live in NC? I'm a transplant from Boston, and I'd never,ever go back. I love the NC Piedmont (we live about an hour south of the Virginia Blue Ridge), and I love the local Scots-Irish culture, including our annual Celtic Festival and Highland Games, which is a ton of fun.

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    2. He's from around, and as far as I know now lives in, Pittsford, NY, after many years in Korea.

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