Monday, July 21, 2014

The British ordinariate: the door's always open


Of course Msgr. Newton's leaving the light on for you.
They will get more clergy, but will they get more laity? This will be the issue for the Ordinariates going forward.
It's always been an issue. First, just because "Farver" was "Catholic" didn't necessarily mean the congregation of his Church of England parish, which is geographical like a Catholic parish, was. Second, people are attached to pretty buildings, etc., more than to the idea and teachings of the true church. So often the priest converts but the congregation doesn't. In America, at St. Clement's, Philadelphia, it was the opposite. The priest was liberal; the leading laymen sincere would-be Catholics, so they left the priest and building behind and came into the church.

Earlier I said: Everybody who was going to come into the church has. Those who are left are really liberal high church, a kind of Protestant, even if they pretend they're not.

To be fair, there are situations where sincere conservative high-church Anglicans including would-be Catholics are outside the church: congregationalism of the former or circumstances not the latter's fault (such as continued resistance from Catholic liberals), neither anything to do with homosexuality and the latter nothing to do with a love of Episcopalianism. But I think they're exceptions.

4 comments:

  1. All I can say isI know a lot of those exceptions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's why I used the disclaimer "I think." Thank you.

      Delete
  2. The US Ordinariate is proving underwhelming. They only want clergy who can bring in a parish with them at this point. Individual priests get sent to the Pastoral Provision, which requires local diocesan permission. Given that there are a whopping four Pastoral Provision parishes, it seems like most local bishops don't want to play. I'd thought that the Ordinariates were created to avoid that issue, but apparently that isn't the case in the US. Maybe they are run differently in the UK.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's what I've been told. Sad. Thanks.

      Delete

Leave comment