Sunday, October 12, 2014

Columbus


  • Man's man, explorer, true-believing Catholic who fell short (he had a mistress), and the Italian (Genoese; Italy's arguably made up) founder of Spanish America. Hooray for Columbus (the Mass > human sacrifice in Mexico), also the occasion for secular Italian-American festivals. Today on Broad Street in South Philly I'll watch the parade. Wondering what crack deejay Jerry "The Geator" Blavat, sharing the grand marshal's car (this year's honoree is Chazz Palminteri), will come up with this year about my hat. (Last year, with Bobby Rydell: "It's the Blues Brothers! Hey, Jake! Give my regards to Elwood!")
  • The City of Brotherly Love; yeah, right. Even most people you know don't care about you so this isn't too surprising. A man is stabbed in the face at a Northeast Philly Pathmark (not strangers; a fight that resumed in the store) and most shoppers don't care. It IS the city that booed and threw snowballs at Santa at an Eagles game, but I understand Boston's even less friendly. New York is great; it's the capital of the world (probably why they put the UN there), so big anybody can find a niche.
  • Yesterday in '62 Vatican II opened. :(
  • Conservation of what ought to be conserved. Before there was "environmentalism" there was "conservation", and conservation is a conservative cause as well as a liberal one.
  • Today is the feast day of St. Wilfrid of York, who shows that Anglican claims that the Church in England wasn't always loyal to the Pope are, well, fake-fake-fake. Cheers! York, where you have St. Margaret Clitherow's house and the only church in England I've seen the English Missal (Tridentine Mass in Book of Common Prayer English) used, All Saints, North Street (medieval and the site of a Marian miracle then if I recall rightly).
  • Movie-theater secrets.

15 comments:

  1. I've been in an Anglo-Catholic church in England that had copies of the Novus Ordo missal. I imagine they probably hid them away whenever the bishop visited.

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    1. In the Church of England, the Anglo-Catholic minority was mostly Anglo-Papalist, actually being what Protestants feared, would-be Roman Catholics. They used to be Tridentine of course, from the early days of their ritualism in the late 1800s; after Vatican II they almost all went Novus Ordo. As an American in England it was strange for me to hear Novus being a badge of orthodoxy ("soundness") among A-Cs! I've seen Novus used in the C of E, at St. Alban's, Holborn 25 years ago.

      Anglo-Catholic ritualists were the first Anglicans to really flout the Prayer Book; English bishops gave up on enforcing it long ago so I doubt that parish you visited hid what it did from the bishop.

      Now of course many of the Anglo-Papalists who really meant it have put their money where their mouths were so they're now the British ordinariate of the Catholic Church along with a few other ex-Anglicans. Why didn't they just become Catholics the normal way? Because their priests are married. And the ordinariate's a better deal than the Pastoral Provision (married ex-Anglican priests who are regular Novus Ordo) because it's protection against our own old Modernists, who didn't/don't want a bunch of high-church, embarrassing conservative Anglo-Catholics coming in.

      American Anglo-Catholics were very Tridentine too but were more likely to remain so after Vatican II, ironically because they WEREN'T wannabe Roman Catholics. Rather, they believed in something they thought was Anglicanism, which didn't need Rome: Hooker plus the Carolines and Non-Jurors plus the Tractarians (none of whom used Roman Catholic ceremonial nor wanted to) plus Roman Catholic ceremonial BUT "libretto by Cranmer," as Fr. Cyril Tomkinson of All Saints, Margaret Street put it; he did things that way too. Roman Missal and Novus Ordo use was and is virtually unknown among Episcopalians. (An exception: the Roman Missal when they snagged a couple of congregations of immigrant ex-Catholics.) Plus their bishops enforced the Prayer Book more than English ones did. In England the Prayer Book was long used AGAINST Anglo-Catholics, as Msgr. Barnes of the ordinariate has explained. In America, paralleling Catholic traditionalists, A-Cs were very attached to the Episcopal 1928 BCP (my first liturgy), including in its hybrid missal form, and remained so when reacting against modern changes and modern theology. That and American Catholic hostility to tradition after Vatican II are why the Continuing churches are American creations and partly why the Episcopal Church's last three A-C dioceses left for ACNA, not the church. Western Rite Orthodoxy also appeals to these ex-Episcopalians.

      The ordinariate Mass is basically Pope Benedict the Great's English Novus Ordo with something 1928-like spliced in (such as the Collect for Purity, the Summary of the Law, the Comfortable Words, the Prayer of Humble Access, and the Thanksgiving after Communion). In the tradition of the Anglican missals (actually banned in many Anglican dioceses) only with the Roman Canon, not Cranmer's: Catholics can't use Cranmer's because for all the beautiful prose it's heresy: "who by his oblation of himself (once offered)." This Mass doesn't make sense for the Brits, who never used Anglican prayers as Anglicans: they should be high-church Novus with married priests, with the options of the English and Roman missals. The American ordinariate should be almost the same but the official ordinariate Mass was made just for them.

      Looking forward to visiting Good Shepherd Jr., the Fellowship of Blessed John Henry Newman, soon, now that it's Catholic, in its new home in Strafford so I can finally see an anglicanized Catholic Mass, and I want to make a road trip to Mt. Calvary, Baltimore, the city's "newest Catholic parish," an Episcopal one from the mid-1800s that has come into the church, priest (now moved), congregation, and building, for their High Mass.

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  2. Singing praises of York - I went to school there and my great grandfather hailed from York before living in Whitby and his seafaring days. I last went there two or three years ago and attended Evensong at the Minster. I was born in Westmorland, but my paternal roots are in Yorkshire. Eee bah gum! Get some suppin', lad!

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    1. Ah, yes. Both York and Whitby I love. And the Oratorians are now in York!!

      John, I've been to the Ordinariate Mass in Oxford, and it has a very nice Tridentine feel. But of course in Oxford the ex-Puseyites would avoid any Novus options (they're there).

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    2. Part of Anglo-Catholicism's charm, both classic ritualist and the new liberal kind, is they love our traditionalist ceremonies as much as we trads do, so the A-C parishes in England often never lost that fun and panache even when they modernized. Encouraged by "the reform of the reform" in the church that Pope Benedict led during his time in the See of Peter, it's not surprising that the British ordinariate's bringing this back; really the reason Benedict created the ordinariates. More troops for tradition, not primarily an ecumenical rescue. I understand another reason is that Benedict learned there were all these Anglicans already using the Roman Rite, hoping somehow to come into the church, which they believed is the true one. "Sign them up!"

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  3. Nope, the novus ordo is basically the foundation of all the modern Anglican apeist liturgies, so I sincerely doubt that the novus ordo would have caused alarm; now, the English Missal, that is indeed another matter.

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    1. True but never underestimate English anti-Catholicism, the basis of their hostility to religion now. Remember, unlike Episcopalians, the Church of England has Evangelicals, who take being Protestant very seriously (and agree with us on the creeds AND on homosexuality; many are fine with women priests).

      Episcopalians don't use it because their high churchmen never wanted to be Roman Catholics and now they market themselves as Catholics who are un-Roman meaning cool and open-minded, so their ex-Catholic liberals would resent it for the same reason British A-Cs used to celebrate it, as a tie (imagined) to mother church. That and residual WASP snobbery ("the ROMAN Church"), also easy to fall into when your tradition does liturgy in English better. Although at the same time, non-A-C Episcopalians have been affecting high church (weekly Communion, chasubles, crossing yourself, crucifixes, "Father") since the '60s to be ecumenical and multicultural (vs. uncool old WASPs — "they're so WHITE"). Took that at face value as a kid (thought they were A-Cs), which eventually was disillusioning of course. Guess they don't know exactly what they are, just that they're not papists or, "ew, fundamentalists."

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    2. Yes and no; even the English Evangelicals use modern liturgies based upon the novus ordo. It is interesting that even the Free Church of England is adopting a very novus ordo type of "contemporary" liturgy rejecting the 1662 BCP.

      One issue, in your otherwise excellent appraisal of the situation as it exists in English and North American Anglo-Catholicism is that the Protestantism of 1662 is apparent, or is it? (Another issue altogether; perhaps it is more a product of late medieval scholastic Eucharistic theology, where only the Words are necessary of the confection of the Sacrament); whilst the Canadian 1962, American 1928, and the Scottish BCP are indeed very Catholic in inspiration, or Eastern. Hence, there was never a need to introduce the Roman canon and the full Roman rite in the communities not legally tied to 1662.

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    3. Right; the Scottish BCP, on which the traditional American one's based, is slightly higher than 1662 (for one thing, mending the "broken" consecration at Communion): Non-Juror influence? The Episcopal Church adopted much of it to thank the Scottish Episcopalians for giving them the episcopate, as they couldn't get it from England at the time, right after American independence. Colonial American Anglicans never had a bishop, being distantly under the Bishop of London; bishops consecrated in England had to swear loyalty to the Crown, so at the time of independence, that wasn't an option. The Scottish Episcopalians aren't a state church so no problem.

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    4. Sorry, meant to write 'Words of Institution"; which in late medieval scholastic theology were all that was felt to be necessary to confect the Sacrament, this is also the same theology evident in Luther's Mass as well. The minimalist interpretation was that the full Canon of the Mass was superfluous and that only the the Words of Christ from the Gospels were necessary. This is not a Protestantism at all, but typical Roman Catholic theology of the time of the Reformation. In some ways both Cranmer and Luther were simply Catholics of their time period.

      Of course one could also argue that the supporters of the more "advanced" new canons of the novus ordo are of this school of thought as well; Less is better.

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    5. I know; it's an interesting reductio and yes, based on Catholic theology.

      When scholars figured out that the church was right all along about having anaphorae, the American Lutheran liberals (now ELCA) backtracked, writing a canon-like thing for their green-covered worship book (their BCP) as an option alongside the classic Lutheran one of just the Verba (since Luther thought the offertory and canon "stank of oblation" so surely the early Christians didn't say that, he imagined). It's ambiguous enough to pass a Protestant's sniff test and such that we probably couldn't accept it, but it sure sounds like one of ours.

      Reminds me of a joke in Anglican seminary years ago: the new French Eucharistic prayer. "Voilà, c'est Jesus!" Or, come to think of it, the South Philly, "get me to the Eagles game on time" version: "Yo, dis is Jesus." They don't pass any tests of antiquity but at least like the Anaphora of SS. Addai and Mari (the oldest one still in use, valid even though it doesn't have the Verba; sort of proves Dix's point about "shape"?) they're orthodox, and without the the problems of the former English paraphrase of the Novus Ordo.

      No wonder American Catholic life stunk for 35 years after Vatican II. I think you can only understand the new Mass in a Catholic way if either you know the old Mass or have read and understood the new Mass in Latin. Few American Catholics do the latter and as time took its toll, the former became fewer. Yet the conservative turnaround is happening; been happening since the late '80s and, even with the setback of Pope Benedict stepping down, is still happening. Our mother the church is indefectible.

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  4. Oh, the last time I attending a full, unchanged, Roman rite in English, now many years ago, was in St Mary Mag, Oxford. The place is now completely novus ordo celebrated on a clerical power desk facing the audience instead of the old east-ward facing altar.

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    1. I was at Mary Mags just as Fr. Wybrew became vicar; he moved it away from old-school Anglo-Catholicism much as Canon Reid did at St. Clement's 20 years later. From talking to him I could tell where he was headed. Understandable: the two preceding vicars had become Catholic so Bishop Harries (met him), a liberal, wanted someone who would stay. (Fr. W, an Orthodoxophile scholar, originally was against women priests BECAUSE of his love of the East; somewhere along the line he flipped sides, like Rowan Williams, another former classic Anglo-Catholic.) From what I remember, the Mass was Alternative Services Book but the old-fashioned "thou" option (Rite B?) with mostly traditional Catholic ceremonial (eastward-facing, fiddlebacks, shovel-ended stoles and maniples). The bulletin at the time listed Sundays after Trinity as well as "of the year" and listed "Mass & Holy Communion," a holdover from the old practice, copied from Catholics before Vatican II, of non-communicating Masses and of giving Communion outside of Mass, such as before or afterwards. My relatively recent impression online was, like St. Clement's, it kept that kind of externals but was on board with the liberal program (big code word: "we're more inclusive now"), like the more Prayer Booky All Saints, Margaret Street (culture vultures). Liberal Anglicans, unlike liberal Catholics, aren't iconoclasts or anti-high church, so I think such a brutal modernization at Mary Mags is unlikely. Stupid to throw away your unique selling point in Brideshead Revisited aesthete Oxford, where as I remember, Catholics can find high church too if they're looking for it (before "Alyoggers," St. Aloysius virtually across the street from Mary Mags, became the Oratory, you had the Ronald Knox Society and Opus Dei at Grandpont House); Anglicans are foolish but they are definitely not stupid like libcaths can be. Among the few religious students, those who want liberal low-ish church already have lots of options, just like in the U.S.

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    2. Very interesting. The last time I attended a high mass there, many years ago, it was strictly English Missal, word-for-word, with not even the Anglican bits; the only thing that was effectively "Anglican" was that when the clergy sat down, they turned the chasuble and dalmatics up and placed their hands on the underside of the vestments (perhaps only Anglo-Catholics reading this will know what I mean).

      Although I haven't been for years, perhaps the Convent of the Incarnation, Fairacres, might still be traditional? But they also seem to be unhealthily interested in Byzantine ikons, which for Anglicans is always a bad sign. Perhaps one of your readers knows?

      In England, many Byzantinophile Anglicans have gone completely new liturgy with the theology to match, they love it because of some eastern bits and pieces and usually have no problem with modern liturgics or the ordination of women; their love of the east is usually fairly contrived and revolves around ikons, candles, incense and hocus-pocus "eastern" spirituality; when they tire of this they go new age or Buddhist.

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    3. The English Missal Low Mass I went to at North Street had no Anglican bits either.

      'Fraid you're right about Fairacres; went there once. Habitless liberals and anti-Catholic too. A crying shame; they were once the A-C copy of the Carmelites.

      Yeah, it's weird how Western liberals pretend to love the East, looking the other way at the East being as traditional as we are: the old cock and bull about the Novus Ordo being more Eastern, etc.

      The modern Anglican version of that is like the pseudo-high church that burned me as a teenage Episcopalian: it's only ecumenical play-acting and trying to be un-WASP.

      The few real Orthodoxophiles in the C of E disbanded and converted, sensibly, (yeah, Fr. Gregory Hallam and his crew) after women priests were voted in.

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