Wednesday, November 21, 2007

Why Roman Catholics ought to vote for Ron Paul
From Thomas Woods at LRC. On that note...
Ron Paul is not a panderer. He’ll speak to an interest group and tell them to their faces that he has opposed and will continue to oppose funding their pet projects.
As a guest on a conservative Protestant radio show I listened to online he wouldn’t tell them what they wanted to hear about using the state to enforce morality regarding homosexuality (‘a non-interventionist in the culture wars’).
As a physician at an inner-city hospital, Ron Paul provided medical care to anyone who needed it, regardless of ability to pay.
Libertarians aren’t the selfish monsters their Christian detractors make them out to be.
Ron Paul believes in a little something called subsidiarity, which happens to be a central principle of Catholic social thought. Subsidiarity holds that all social functions should be carried out by the most local unit possible, as opposed to the dehumanizing alternative whereby distant bureaucratic structures are routinely and unthinkingly entrusted with more and more responsibilities for human well-being.
To the secularists, this was John Paul II’s unforgivable sin – he placed service to God above service to the state. Most politicians view the state, not God, as the supreme ruler on earth. They simply cannot abide a theology that does not comport with their vision of unlimited state power. This is precisely why both conservatives and liberals savaged John Paul II when his theological pronouncements did not fit their goals. But perhaps their goals simply were not godly.
The same reason Stalin hated the Ukrainian Catholic Church.
Speaking of John Paul II, it is important to remember that that pope was a strong opponent of the U.S. government’s attack on Iraq, sending his personal representative, Cardinal Pio Laghi, to Washington shortly before the commencement of hostilities in order to insist to the president that such a war would be unjust.

The Pope’s first comments after the war broke out were these: "When war, as in these days in Iraq, threatens the fate of humanity, it is ever more urgent to proclaim, with a strong and decisive voice, that only peace is the road to follow to construct a more just and united society."

Before his election as Pope Benedict XVI, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger was asked if a U.S. government attack on Iraq would be just. "Certainly not," came the reply. He predicted that "the damage would be greater than the values one wishes to save."


[Later] Ratzinger said: "It was right to resist the war and its threats of destruction…. It should never be the responsibility of just one nation to make decisions for the world."

...a war that was based on falsehoods that we would have laughed at if they’d been uttered by Leonid Brezhnev.

It is especially satisfying to learn that in the second quarter of 2007, Ron Paul received more donations from active duty and retired military personnel than any other Republican candidate.

My main argument to you, though, is not a specifically Catholic one.
It doesn’t have to be!
It’s one that should resonate with anybody who values honesty, integrity, and decency.

...why the media fears him. Unlike the rest of them, Ron Paul is
unowned.

No comments:

Post a comment

Leave comment