Sunday, June 02, 2013

Second Sunday after Pentecost

Mass: Factus est Dominus protector meus.

In some places the External Solemnity of Corpus Christi: Cibavit eos ex adipe frumenti, alleluia.
Deus, qui nobis sub sacramento mirabili, passionis tuae memoriam reliquisti: tribue, quaesumus, ita nos corporis et sanguinis tui sacra mysteria venerari, ut redemptionis tuae fructum in nobis iugiter sentiamus. Qui vivis et regnas cum Deo Patre in unitate Spiritus Sancti, Deus, per omnia saecula saeculorum. Amen.
Modestinus:
It's worth pointing out that you can find an increasing number of churches (usually several in a single diocese) that have begun to shift their liturgical praxis around the example set by Benedict XVI and other "high profile" Catholics who take the Mass seriously, whether Novus Ordo or Tridentine. I don't think you will find a more reverent, beautiful, and transcendent liturgy in Chicago -- Catholic or Orthodox -- than what is offered daily at St. John Cantius in Chicago, and St. John's is not alone in the diocese. Having recently relocated back to my home city of Grand Rapids, I was nervous about what I would find here given that many of the Catholic parishes here have internalized the Evangelical forms of worship that dominate in these parts. Much to my delight there are several parishes in the city which celebrate both the Novus Ordo and Tridentine Masses with a remarkable degree of solemnity. The times, I hope, are a changin'.

At some point the Catholic laity have to get off their pews and do something. If people don't like the
Novus Ordo Mass, then ask for the Tridentine. Benedict XVI bestowed a great gift to all Catholics everywhere, but it is up to the laity to ask so that the they can receive. And if their local bishop denies them their request, there are steps they can take to rectify the situation. Moreover, my experience has been that diocesan parishes which serve the Tridentine Mass tend to serve the Novus Ordo with far more reverence. It seems that in many circumstances the rubrics of the Tridentine -- which are far more exact than those found in the Novus Ordo -- inform the Novus Ordo, a result that only strengthens that form of Mass. But again, the laity need to push for this. Griping won't solve anything.

Also, for what it's worth,
the push for liturgical renewal in the Catholic Church is, thankfully, coming from the younger generation. Traditionalist groups within the Church -- both regular (e.g., Fraternity of St. Peter) and irregular (e.g., Society of St. Pius X) -- have witnessed a rapid growth in vocations over the past two decades. More and more newly ordained priests are taking the initiative to learn the Tridentine Mass, and an increasing number of seminaries are offering instruction in the Tridentine Mass as part of its training. Also, there are more young priests now who want to serve the Novus Ordo reverently and do away with the guitars and tambourines that chased so many out of the Church during the 70s and 80s. Renewal takes time, and it's a process that can certainly be interrupted more easily than completed, but so it goes. Nothing worth having isn't worth fighting for.
Right. Benedict the Great and high churchmanship make my parish’s Novus (which I only see on holy days of obligation and on flea-market Sundays anyway) not a real problem, even though I don’t like it.

Been to Cantius once, outside of Mass. It’s great.

2 comments:

  1. ----->>>It seems that in many circumstances the rubrics of the Tridentine -- which are far more exact than those found in the Novus Ordo -- inform the Novus Ordo, a result that only strengthens that form of Mass. <<<<-----

    The TLM's rubrics put a metaphorical straight jacket on the celebrating priest because priests just cannot be trusted with the liturgy. Proof of this is all the ad lib-ing and "I'm star of the show" behavior going on since 1969. I must admit, however, that 90% of this is no longer operative in the parishes of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe that I have attended of late. Nonetheless, it still happens occasionally to a much lesser degree of irritation and hokiness. I still don't like the N.O.M. even when it is celebrated decently, but I can live with it, thanks in great part to a reasonably accurate vernacular translation of the Roman Missal, even if that translation is not exactly a work of literary art. After all, we are not traditional Anglicans and we (unfortunately) cannot claim the KJV, etc. as part of our liturgical patrimony! LOL

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    Replies
    1. Nonetheless, it still happens occasionally to a much lesser degree of irritation and hokiness.

      "Father, it's not about YOU!"

      LOL. We still have a few of those showboating Boomer priests in our diocese. But thankfully, as you say, they are becoming rarer.

      Our younger priests and seminarians are FANTASTIC. Thank You, Jesus!

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